Tag: Asian greens

Recipe: Roasted Carrots and Greens

With our last week of this season’s CSA at hand and the holiday season just around the corner, I want to leave you with a simple recipe you could serve at your Thanksgiving dinner.  Or you could just make this tonight because it’s cozy and nourishing and pretty much perfect for a brisk fall night.

Start by placing a rectangular rimmed baking stone in the oven and preheating to 400 F.  If you don’t have a stone, use any rimmed baking sheet.

Next, scrub and trim 2 pounds of carrots (around 18 medium-sized carrots).  Quarter the carrots lengthwise and put them in a large bowl.  I use the Pampered Chef 8-cup batter bowl because it has a lid, which makes the next step easier.  And that next step is tossing those lovely carrot pieces with 1 tablespoon of olive oil.  (As tempting as it may be, don’t add extra oil olive or the carrots won’t roast well!)

Place the carrots evenly onto the baking stone and lightly season with sea salt and freshly ground pepper.  Roast for 20 minutes, then flip them, making sure to keep them evenly spaced (none on top of each other).  Roast for 10 more minutes.

While the carrots are roasting, prep the rest of your ingredients.  Chop 1/4 cup walnuts, mince 2 cloves of garlic, and roughly chop 3 cups of arugula/tat soi/mustard greens.  When the carrots are done with their initial roasting,  sprinkle with the garlic and walnuts and roast for 5-7 minutes more, until the nuts are toasted and the garlic tender.

Remove the stone from the oven, fold in the greens, and sprinkle the whole batch of goodness with 1/4 cider vinegar.  Serve immediately.  Enjoy! 

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Roasted Carrots with Greens
A perfect roasted vegetable side for Thanksgiving dinner.
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
45 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
45 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 pounds carrots, scrubbed and trimmed
  2. 1 T olive oil
  3. sea salt, to taste
  4. freshly ground pepper, to taste
  5. 2 garlic cloves, minced
  6. 1/4 cup walnuts, chopped
  7. 3 cups arugula, tat soi, and/or mustard greens, stems removed and roughly chopped
Instructions
  1. Place rimmed baking stone in oven and preheat to 400 F.
  2. Quarter carrots lengthwise. Place carrots in large bowl and toss with olive oil.
  3. Place carrots on baking sheet, making sure they're evenly spaced. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Roast carrots 20 minutes. Flip them over, then roast for 10 minutes more.
  5. Remove carrots from oven. Sprinkle evenly with garlic and walnuts. Roast 5-7 minutes, until nuts are toasted and garlic is tender.
  6. Remove from oven. Fold in greens, then sprinkle cider vinegar over the carrots.
  7. Serve immediately. Enjoy!
Adapted from Better Homes and Gardens "Roasted Sweets and Greens"
Adapted from Better Homes and Gardens "Roasted Sweets and Greens"
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/

Recipe: Chopped Salad with Asian Greens

This spring we’re growing some new-to-us greens from the Asian Greens section of the seed catalog—Tat Soi, White-Stemmed Pac Choy, and Vitamin Green—along with a new-to-us mustard green, Garnet Giant Mustard.  Full-size, these greens are most often used in cooking, but now in early spring, in their tender baby size, the Asian Greens are perfect raw and fresh.

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I’ll admit these Asian and mustard greens take some getting used to.  I’ll also admit I haven’t had a great deal of success in getting my boys—ages 4 and 6—to fully embrace these flavorful greens, at least at the dinner table.  But the other day, I was working in the hoop house while discussing Bakugans with my 4-year-old Asher, and I nonchalantly offered him a few Vitamin Green leaves, which he popped in his mouth and ate without comment.  Okay, okay, he was distracted—I mean, we were talking about Bakugans!—but still he ate some and that’s a start.

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Our hope is that you too will give these a try.  So at this point in the season, instead of selling varieties individually, we’ve decided to toss them together into in Asian Greens Salad Mix and offer you what is essentially a nutrient powerhouse.  When eating all four of these greens together, you’ll get a great source of calcium, beta carotenes, vitamins A, C, and K, antioxidants, and phytonutrients.  Deborah Madison, cook and author of Vegetable Literacy, says of mustard greens’ health benefits—and this holds true for the Asian greens too—“These plants are such dynamos that we would do well to find ways to enjoy them.”

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One way I’ve enjoyed these greens this past week is in a chopped salad with a gingery, garlicky dressing.

For this recipe, you’re going to start the night before by making the dressing, which doubles as a chicken marinade.  Mix together rice vinegar, soy sauce, minced fresh ginger, minced garlic, peanut oil, and olive oil, and shake vigorously in your jar (or, if you’ve had a Grolsch since my first post this spring, use the bottle!).

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Thinly slice ½ pound of boneless, skinless chicken thighs (or breasts if you prefer white meat) into 1-inch pieces.  For local folks looking for semi-locally raised chicken, try Miller Amish Poultry from Tysens Grocery in DeMotte. Place the chicken in a bowl, pour about half the dressing over it, and marinate overnight, or at least 8 hours.

Fast forward to salad time.  First step, heat up that trusty skillet because it’s time to sauté the marinated chicken, cooking about 4 minutes on each side.  When it’s finished cooking, set the chicken aside to cool.

Meanwhile, gather up the rest of your ingredients in a large bowl, starting with about 8 cups of the Asian Green Salad Mix, then adding a half cup of each of these:

  • fresh pineapple chunks
  • fresh Clementine wedges
  • sliced radishes
  • sliced green onions
  • peanuts
  • chicken strips

Toss all this goodness together, then dump everything out on your cutting board and—hence the salad’s name—get chopping!  I like this chopping advice from First We Feast:

Arrange your greens in a rough rectangle, then use your largest, sharpest knife to cut all the way down to the board. Lift the knife, and cut again in a parallel line about an inch from the first. Repeat until you reach the end of the rectangle. Rotate the board 90 degrees, then do again. That might be enough chopping, but if you want a finer mince, toss the ingredients to redistribute, then chop in a grid once more. 

Once you have the consistency you’re looking for, return everything to your large bowl and add a couple tablespoons of that dressing you made the night before.  Gently toss the salad, then place the whole mix in a serving dish.  At this point, you can leave the salad as is, or decorate by lining up about ½ cup of each ingredient on top of the salad.

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One last note about this salad.  I’m a big fan of using local, seasonal ingredients whenever possible.  Obviously, pineapple and clementines don’t really fit the bill here, but considering the only “fruit” I have growing in my garden right now is rhubarb, I decided to branch out.  If that’s not your style, you’re welcome to try the rhubarb—just make sure to tell me how it tasted!

Photography and Food Styling: Anne Kingma

Chopped Salad with Asian Greens
A refreshing chopped salad with Asian Greens, marinated chicken, spring veggies, and fresh fruit.
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For the dressing
  1. 1/4 cup rice vinegar
  2. 2 T soy sauce
  3. 2 tsp brown sugar
  4. 1 T grated ginger
  5. 2 large cloves garlic, minced
  6. ¼ cup peanut oil
  7. ¼ cup olive oil
For the salad
  1. 8 cups Asian Greens Salad Mix
  2. 1 cup pineapple chunks
  3. 1 cup Clementine segments
  4. 1 cup peanuts
  5. 1 cup radishes, sliced
  6. 1 cup green onions, sliced
  7. 1 cup sliced, marinated and sautéed chicken thighs
For the dressing
  1. Mix together dressing ingredients in a jar: rice vinegar, soy sauce, brown sugar, minced ginger, minced garlic, peanut oil, and olive oil. Set aside.
For the salad
  1. Thinly slice ½ pound chicken thighs. Place in a shallow dish and pour about half of the dressing over the chicken. Cover and refrigerate over night or at least 8 hours.
  2. When the chicken is ready, sauté the strips for about 4 minutes on each side until the chicken is done. Set aside to cool.
  3. In a large bowl, combine salad mix, and ½ cup of each: pineapple, Clementine segments, peanuts, radishes, green onions, and chicken. Toss together, then pour out on a large cutting board. Chop the ingredients into small pieces.
  4. Return the chopped salad to the large bowl.
  5. Drizzle about 2 Tbsp of the remaining dressing onto the salad. Gently toss.
  6. Place the salad into a serving dish. Line or sprinkle the remaining pineapple, Clementine, peanuts, radishes, green onions, and chicken on top of the salad, and serve.
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/

Recipe: First of Spring Salad

In the winter I tend to cook hot dishes—chili with frozen peppers and tomatoes from our summer garden; stir fry with overwintered carrots, spinach, and green onions; hot soup with potatoes, kale, and garlic.  But in the spring, when I can see tiny little lettuce and carrot and spinach and beet leaves pushing their way out of the soil, I want to eat directly and immediately out of the earth. 

Lettuce MixCarrots 2spinach with first true leaves

 Beets

So we’re going to start this spring with a series of salad recipes, ways to eat your produce fresh and raw.  We’re going to try to keep it simple.  We’re busy, like you are, but we never want to be too busy to share and enjoy a good meal.

Club Style Salad (Resized)

Start by mixing together 4 cups of greens–baby salad mix, baby spinach, baby beet greens, Asian greens–whatever you prefer.  Put the greens in your favorite salad serving dish, and set aside.

Next, get those toppings ready.  Trim and chop a green onion or two, slice an avocado, and grab one handful of cashews, another handful dried lo mein noodles.  Evenly sprinkle these over your greens.

Before you dig in, don’t forget the dressing!  Almost any dressing works with this versatile salad, but I like to use a recipe for Oriental Dressing, given to me by Sarah Oudman.  Mix together rice vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, vegetable oil, and a touch of sesame oil in a jar (or, in my case, a recycled Grolsch beer bottle) and shake well. This dressing is delicious but strong—advice from Farmer Dan: Dress lightly to enjoy the full flavors of the greens!

This salad works great as a side, but you can easily make into your main dish by adding more protein like sliced fried eggs, bleu cheese, grilled chicken, or chickpeas.

Salad with Grolsch (resized)

 What’s your favorite salad recipe?  What kind of salads would you like to see featured on the blog?

Photographs and Food Styling: Anne Kingma

First of Spring Salad
Serves 4
A fresh, raw salad to kick off the start of spring.
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Prep Time
15 min
Total Time
15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Total Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 4 cups greens (baby spinach, baby salad mix, baby beet greens, etc)
  2. 1-2 chopped green onions, trimmed and chopped
  3. 1 avocado, sliced into 1” pieces
  4. ¼ cup cashews
  5. ¼ cup dried lo mein noodles
  6. ¼ cup rice vinegar
  7. 1 Tbsp sugar
  8. 3 Tbsp soy sauce
  9. 2 Tbsp vegetable oil
  10. 1 tsp sesame oil
Instructions
  1. Mix greens and place in salad serving dish.
  2. Evenly sprinkle green onions, avocado pieces, cashews, and noodles over the greens.
  3. Pour rice vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, vegetable oil, and sesame oil in a jar. Shake well.
  4. Right before eating, lightly dress the salad.
Notes
  1. To make this dish your main meal, add more protein, such as sliced fried eggs, bleu cheese, grilled chicken, or chickpeas.
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/
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