Tag: green onions

Recipe: Red Curry Shrimp with Carrots, Red Peppers, and Green Onions

Growing up in Indiana in a family that didn’t fish, my exposure to seafood was mostly limited to a rare night out at Long John Silvers when I was a kid.  It wasn’t until I met Dan and traveled to his hometown of Portland, Maine, that I began to really love seafood.  But, living so far from the coast and having little cooking experience with seafood, I rarely ate it when back home in the Midwest.  

I still don’t have much experience when it comes to cooking with seafood, but this summer I took the plunge (it’s okay, you can laugh at that terrible pun) and purchased my first pound of live saltwater shrimp–right here in DeMotte, Indiana.

Our first introduction to JT Shrimp involved a tour of their facility, where Dan , our brother-in-law Luke, Harper and Asher got to see firsthand how Wheatfield, Indiana residents Scott and Leslie Tysen raise saltwater shrimp.   The Tysens use a zero exchange aerobic heterotrophic system to raise their shrimp; in other words, they use a system that makes the water as close as possible to the shrimp’s natural habitat, without the pollutants you would normally find in the ocean.  The indoor system involves running water through several filters to remove unwanted bacteria, algae, and viruses from the water, allowing for the growth of large, healthy shrimp.

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JT Shrimp’s Scott Tysen showing Harper, Asher, and Uncle Luke a shrimp at their Wheatfield facility Photo: Dan Perkins

When I purchased that pound of shrimp this summer, I was pretty intimidated.  I had a recipe in mind, but how was I going to get the shrimp OUT so that I could cook them?  Thankfully, Leslie explained how to remove the head and peel the shrimp.  Before I get to that though, you should know that when you buy from JT Shrimp, they give you serious freshness.  At the DeMotte Market, where I bought mine this summer, Leslie literally caught the live shrimp right there in front of me.  She placed them in a plastic bag about 1/3 filled with ice, where the shrimp expired quickly (at least I hope so!) without water.

When I got home, I placed the bag of shrimp in the fridge, and about a half hour before I was ready to peel them, I moved them to the freezer.  Leslie assured me this quick freeze would make for easy peeling, and she was right!  (I know she was right because I didn’t completely follow her instructions.  She suggested taking two shrimp out of the freezer at a time, peeling those, then taking two more, and so on.  I did this at first, but about a halfway through I lost my patience and grabbed the rest of the bag, meaning the last five shrimp or so were no longer frozen by the time I got to peeling them.  Obvious Moral of the Story: I would’ve saved more time listening to Leslie’s directions.)  

Here’s a pictorial journey for the removal of the heads and peeling.  Let me just say that Harper is a great helper!

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Cut off the head with a chef’s knife or kitchen shears.

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Remove the upper legs.

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Grasp the tail between your left hand thumb and index finger, grasp the upper section of the shrimp with your right hand thumb and index finger, and PULL!

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Your shrimp are ready!  Quick note: Don’t throw away the heads and shells.  I know they’re not the most pleasant to look at it, but put them in a tupperware and stick them in the fridge.  I’ll revisit them at the end of this post.

Now let’s get to this delicious, comfort-food curry!

First, start your rice. I like to serve this curry with organic white basmati rice, which takes about 20 minutes total, with 15 minutes of cooking time.  If you start your rice RIGHT NOW, it should be good to go right when your curry is ready.

Next, time to prep your produce.  Mince one clove of Perkins’ Good Earth Farm garlic, julienne three carrots, and thinly slice half a red pepper.  Set aside. Grab three green onions.  Chop two and set aside. For the third, cut into 1 1/2″ pieces, slice each piece in half, and, you guessed it, set aside.  

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I like to use a wok for this recipe, but you can just as easily use a skillet.  Heat your wok over medium-high heat, then add two teaspoons of olive oil.  Once the oil’s hot, add the chopped garlic and half the chopped green onion.  Saute for about one minute, or until the garlic and onion start to brown.

Next, shake the can of coconut milk as hard as you can since the coconut milk usually separates in the can.  Add the milk to the garlic/onions, bring to a boil, then lower to a simmer over medium-low heat.  

Stir in one tablespoon of coconut sugar (or brown sugar) and two tablespoons red curry paste.  (If you haven’t bought this before, local friends can find it at Tysens Family Market (usually) or Meijer.) (I’m going for a record–how many parentheses can I use in one paragraph?) 🙂

Bring the coconut milk back to a boil.  Add the carrots, then lower to a simmer for five minutes. 

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Another helper!

Add shrimp, peppers, and green onions.  Cook for 3-5 minutes, or until shrimp have just turned into a C-shape and the peppers and carrots are al dente.  Don’t overcook the shrimp!  (To quote from JT Shrimp’s recipe page on their website: “Shrimp that have twisted into an O-shape are terribly, irreparably overcooked. Overcooked shrimp are rubbery and sad. We hope you never have to eat one for your whole life.” I agree!)

So once those shrimp are just turning into C’s, remove the wok from the heat and stir in 1 tablespoon of fish sauce.

For a pretty presentation, pour a ladle of curry on a plate, top with a cup of rice, drizzle a little more curry and a few shrimp and veggies on top, then sprinkle on more of those chopped green onions.  For easier eating, I serve this dish to my children in bowls, with rice on the bottom, curry on top.  Either way, yum!

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Alright, now to get back to those shrimp peels.  Sticking with our waste-free-kitchen theme, don’t throw those out just yet!  They’re exactly what you need make a shrimp stock.  If you don’t have time for that when you make the curry, no problem.  Simply toss the peels and heads in a freezer bag–you can freeze them for up 3 months.  And hopefully by then I’ll have posted the recipe I used to make my shrimp stock.  I used the stock for cooking rice, and when I tasted the rice I was immediately reminded of paella.  Which, naturally, made me want to buy more shrimp.

If you’d like to buy shrimp from JT Shrimp, you can contact Scott and Leslie through their website by clicking here.   Don’t forget to comment here and tell us how you used your shrimp!

Photos (except for that first one!): Anne Kingma

 

Red Curry Shrimp with Carrots, Red Peppers, and Green Onions
A comfort-food, tasty curry.
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Ingredients
  1. 2 tsp olive oil
  2. 1 clove Perkins' Good Earth Farm garlic, minced
  3. 1 can unsweetened coconut milk
  4. 2 T red curry paste
  5. 1 T coconut sugar (or brown sugar)
  6. 1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined
  7. 3 carrots, julienned
  8. 1/2 red pepper, thinly sliced
  9. 3 green onions--2 chopped / 1 cut into 1 1/2" pieces and thinly sliced
  10. 1 T fish sauce
Instructions
  1. Heat olive oil in a wok or skillet over medium-high heat. When oil is hot, saute garlic and half the chopped green onions for 1 minute, stirring occasionally.
  2. Add coconut milk and bring to boil, then lower to a simmer on medium-low heat.
  3. Stir in curry paste and sugar. Bring the coconut milk back to a boil. Add carrots, then lower to a simmer for 5 minutes.
  4. Add shrimp, peppers, and sliced green onions. Cook for 3-5 minutes, until shrimp have just turned into a C-shape and the vegetables are al dente.
  5. Remove from heat and stir in fish sauce.
Notes
  1. Serve with jasmine or white basmati rice. Enjoy!
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/

 

The Salad

Let’s talk about the most basic way to eat those leafy greens you’ll find nearly every week in your share: The Salad.

 Fresh greens and root crops make up the bulk of your fall share, and one of the great things about our greens is that they’re almost always harvested the morning of distribution, and if not the morning of, you’re getting them within just a a few days of harvest.  We’re talking serious freshness here, people.  Which makes them perfect for a leafy salad.

If you’re looking for something specific, try these fall salad recipes from the farm blog: Kale Salad with Apples and Figs , Chopped Salad with Asian GreensGreen with Maple Apples and Onions.

But this post is less about giving a specific recipe and more about giving you ideas for how to make a salad of whatever you have in the house, Waste-Free-Kitchen-yet-still-super-tasty-style.

The most basic salad is a simple side salad made up of about an ounce of fresh greens and tossed with your favorite dressing.  (Or, if you’re Farmer Dan, just greens.  For real!)

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1/4 oz serving for child / 1 oz serving for adult

We, however, often eat salad as our lunchtime meal, a time when we need more than greens to power through the rest of the day.  In this case, I like to top 2-3 ounces of greens with some combination of the following:

Savory Salad

fresh veggies, chopped or grated (peppers, cucumbers, beets, radishes)

cheese, grated or cubed (cheddar, havarti, pepper jack, mozzarella)

beans (garbanzo, black, kidney, pinto)

meat (usually leftovers from the night before)

hard-boiled egg, chopped

fresh herbs, chopped (thyme, oregano, basil)

tortilla chips, crumbled

dressing (sometimes store-bought; sometimes a quick, homemade-for-one vinaigrette)

Sweet Salad

fresh fruit, chopped or sliced (apples, pears, strawberries, grapes)

cheese (Brie, cheddar, Camembert, blue cheese, gouda)

caramelized onions and garlic

nuts, chopped (pecans, walnuts, almonds)

dressing, like poppyseed or a honey-mustard vinaigrette

Here we go.  I’m going to make a salad here and now out of whatever’s in my fridge, pantry and garden, and show you what I come up with.  Be right back!

This is what I came up with:

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A little bit of this, a little bit of that: pepperoni, cucumbers, hard-boiled egg, brick cheese, green onions, olives, red-wine vinegar/avocado oil/garlic vinaigrette

I used salad greens but you can use any type of green for your base–spinach, kale, mustard greens, tat soi, bok choy, beet greens–any kind of green!  Each one will give your salad a slightly different taste and texture–yay for culinary adventures!

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Later this week we’ll talk more about vinagraittes, the quick-and-easy salad dressing you can make in less than five minutes and that can truly make or break your salad’s flavor.

What are your favorite salad toppings?

Recipe: California Rolls with Radishes and Greens

A couple weeks ago I received this delightful birthday card from my son Harper.

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There’s lot of love in this card!  There’s also soosee, which is a mostly phonetic version of—you may have guessed it—sushi!  While Harper has had actual sushi before, at home I only make California rolls, or sushi made without raw fish, but sushi is A TON more fun to say, especially when you’re seven. 

After receiving this card, I made a couple rounds of California rolls for my little guy, and he proceeded to have them for lunch three times the following week.  I used kale or spinach for Harper’s filling, but you can use any veggie you want.

Before I get into the recipe, I’d like to give the disclaimer that I really know very little about sushi.  I made sushi for the first time at a friend-of-a-friend’s house in Spain in 2005.  I can’t remember the details, but I’m guessing we used bamboo mats and sushi rice and raw fish.  Fast forward ten years, and I’m still making these little rolls, but in my own super-simplified way.  Anyway, I may not know a lot about sushi or California rolls, but I do something about cooking with veggies.  If you’d like advice from an expert, check out this Food and Wine post featuring sushi master Masahuru Morimoto

While you’ll probably have most of the ingredients for California rolls in your house, there’s a good possibility you won’t have a key ingredient sushi-nori, or seaweed wraps. 

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Fortunately, our local grocery store Tysens does carry this ingredient in aisle 2, or you can purchase at least five different highly-rated nori on amazon.  

To begin, set up your work space.  I lay out two nori on a cutting board.  Around the cutting board I arrange the rest of my ingredients: cream cheese, rice, sliced veggies, and a little bowl of water.

Spread a thin layer of cream cheese on the nori, stopping within an or so of the far end.

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Next, dip your fingers in the water (this will keep the rice from sticking to your fingers), and add a layer of rice over the cream cheese.  Most people use seasoned sushi rice, but since I’m often using these rolls as a meal for my child, I like to use organic long-grain brown rice.  In the sushi world, there are probably rules forbidding this type of replacement; fortunately these rules don’t apply in my home.

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Now it’s time for the fun stuff—veggies!  Try any combination that sounds good to you. I’m going use produce from your share this week: radishes, radish greens, green onions, kale, and/or spinach.  Slice the veggies into strips, then line them up in a row on the edge of the nori that’s closest to you. 

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Now, carefully and tightly roll the nori away from you, tucking in the veggies, continuing until the wrap is all rolled up except that empty inch at the end.  Dip your finger in the water, run your finger along the edge of the wrap, and finish rolling.

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Finally, use a sharp knife to slice the roll.  I start from the middle and work my way to the ends.  And because I don’t use a bamboo mat, my ends are often unsightly, so I feel compelled to eat them on the spot instead of waiting until dinner.  Sometimes it’s tough being the cook.

California rolls are commonly served with soy sauce, wasabi, and pickled ginger.  Dan’s the only one in our family who likes wasabi, so I keep some on hand for him.  None of us are big fans of pickled ginger, but I recommend you at least give it a try once.  And Harper and I prefer simply dipping our California rolls in soy sauce.  What’s your favorite way to eat sushi or California rolls?

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Photography and Food Styling: Anne Kingma

California Rolls with Radishes and Greens
Serves 4
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Ingredients
  1. 4 sushi-nori sheets
  2. 2-4 ounces cream cheese
  3. 1 cup cooked long-grain brown rice
  4. 1 cup thinly sliced greens or vegetables (radishes, radish greens, green onions, kale, spinach)
Instructions
  1. Lay out nori sheets on a cutting board or kitchen counter.
  2. Spread a thin layer of cream cheese on each sheet or nori, leaving one inch of space at the far end of the wrap.
  3. Dip your fingers in water, then spread a layer of rice over the cream cheese.
  4. Line up sliced vegetables or greens on the edge of the nori closest to you.
  5. Roll the nori away from you. Tuck in the vegetables, then continue a firm roll until you reach the empty inch at the end of the sheet. Dip your finger in water, run your fingers along the edge of the wrap, and finish rolling.
  6. Slice with a sharp knife.
  7. Serve with soy sauce, wasabi, and/or pickled ginger. Enjoy!
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/

Recipe: Chopped Salad with Asian Greens

This spring we’re growing some new-to-us greens from the Asian Greens section of the seed catalog—Tat Soi, White-Stemmed Pac Choy, and Vitamin Green—along with a new-to-us mustard green, Garnet Giant Mustard.  Full-size, these greens are most often used in cooking, but now in early spring, in their tender baby size, the Asian Greens are perfect raw and fresh.

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I’ll admit these Asian and mustard greens take some getting used to.  I’ll also admit I haven’t had a great deal of success in getting my boys—ages 4 and 6—to fully embrace these flavorful greens, at least at the dinner table.  But the other day, I was working in the hoop house while discussing Bakugans with my 4-year-old Asher, and I nonchalantly offered him a few Vitamin Green leaves, which he popped in his mouth and ate without comment.  Okay, okay, he was distracted—I mean, we were talking about Bakugans!—but still he ate some and that’s a start.

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Our hope is that you too will give these a try.  So at this point in the season, instead of selling varieties individually, we’ve decided to toss them together into in Asian Greens Salad Mix and offer you what is essentially a nutrient powerhouse.  When eating all four of these greens together, you’ll get a great source of calcium, beta carotenes, vitamins A, C, and K, antioxidants, and phytonutrients.  Deborah Madison, cook and author of Vegetable Literacy, says of mustard greens’ health benefits—and this holds true for the Asian greens too—“These plants are such dynamos that we would do well to find ways to enjoy them.”

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One way I’ve enjoyed these greens this past week is in a chopped salad with a gingery, garlicky dressing.

For this recipe, you’re going to start the night before by making the dressing, which doubles as a chicken marinade.  Mix together rice vinegar, soy sauce, minced fresh ginger, minced garlic, peanut oil, and olive oil, and shake vigorously in your jar (or, if you’ve had a Grolsch since my first post this spring, use the bottle!).

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Thinly slice ½ pound of boneless, skinless chicken thighs (or breasts if you prefer white meat) into 1-inch pieces.  For local folks looking for semi-locally raised chicken, try Miller Amish Poultry from Tysens Grocery in DeMotte. Place the chicken in a bowl, pour about half the dressing over it, and marinate overnight, or at least 8 hours.

Fast forward to salad time.  First step, heat up that trusty skillet because it’s time to sautĂ© the marinated chicken, cooking about 4 minutes on each side.  When it’s finished cooking, set the chicken aside to cool.

Meanwhile, gather up the rest of your ingredients in a large bowl, starting with about 8 cups of the Asian Green Salad Mix, then adding a half cup of each of these:

  • fresh pineapple chunks
  • fresh Clementine wedges
  • sliced radishes
  • sliced green onions
  • peanuts
  • chicken strips

Toss all this goodness together, then dump everything out on your cutting board and—hence the salad’s name—get chopping!  I like this chopping advice from First We Feast:

Arrange your greens in a rough rectangle, then use your largest, sharpest knife to cut all the way down to the board. Lift the knife, and cut again in a parallel line about an inch from the first. Repeat until you reach the end of the rectangle. Rotate the board 90 degrees, then do again. That might be enough chopping, but if you want a finer mince, toss the ingredients to redistribute, then chop in a grid once more. 

Once you have the consistency you’re looking for, return everything to your large bowl and add a couple tablespoons of that dressing you made the night before.  Gently toss the salad, then place the whole mix in a serving dish.  At this point, you can leave the salad as is, or decorate by lining up about ½ cup of each ingredient on top of the salad.

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One last note about this salad.  I’m a big fan of using local, seasonal ingredients whenever possible.  Obviously, pineapple and clementines don’t really fit the bill here, but considering the only “fruit” I have growing in my garden right now is rhubarb, I decided to branch out.  If that’s not your style, you’re welcome to try the rhubarb—just make sure to tell me how it tasted!

Photography and Food Styling: Anne Kingma

Chopped Salad with Asian Greens
A refreshing chopped salad with Asian Greens, marinated chicken, spring veggies, and fresh fruit.
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For the dressing
  1. 1/4 cup rice vinegar
  2. 2 T soy sauce
  3. 2 tsp brown sugar
  4. 1 T grated ginger
  5. 2 large cloves garlic, minced
  6. ÂĽ cup peanut oil
  7. ÂĽ cup olive oil
For the salad
  1. 8 cups Asian Greens Salad Mix
  2. 1 cup pineapple chunks
  3. 1 cup Clementine segments
  4. 1 cup peanuts
  5. 1 cup radishes, sliced
  6. 1 cup green onions, sliced
  7. 1 cup sliced, marinated and sautéed chicken thighs
For the dressing
  1. Mix together dressing ingredients in a jar: rice vinegar, soy sauce, brown sugar, minced ginger, minced garlic, peanut oil, and olive oil. Set aside.
For the salad
  1. Thinly slice ½ pound chicken thighs. Place in a shallow dish and pour about half of the dressing over the chicken. Cover and refrigerate over night or at least 8 hours.
  2. When the chicken is ready, sauté the strips for about 4 minutes on each side until the chicken is done. Set aside to cool.
  3. In a large bowl, combine salad mix, and ½ cup of each: pineapple, Clementine segments, peanuts, radishes, green onions, and chicken. Toss together, then pour out on a large cutting board. Chop the ingredients into small pieces.
  4. Return the chopped salad to the large bowl.
  5. Drizzle about 2 Tbsp of the remaining dressing onto the salad. Gently toss.
  6. Place the salad into a serving dish. Line or sprinkle the remaining pineapple, Clementine, peanuts, radishes, green onions, and chicken on top of the salad, and serve.
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/

Recipe: First of Spring Salad

In the winter I tend to cook hot dishes—chili with frozen peppers and tomatoes from our summer garden; stir fry with overwintered carrots, spinach, and green onions; hot soup with potatoes, kale, and garlic.  But in the spring, when I can see tiny little lettuce and carrot and spinach and beet leaves pushing their way out of the soil, I want to eat directly and immediately out of the earth. 

Lettuce MixCarrots 2spinach with first true leaves

 Beets

So we’re going to start this spring with a series of salad recipes, ways to eat your produce fresh and raw.  We’re going to try to keep it simple.  We’re busy, like you are, but we never want to be too busy to share and enjoy a good meal.

Club Style Salad (Resized)

Start by mixing together 4 cups of greens–baby salad mix, baby spinach, baby beet greens, Asian greens–whatever you prefer.  Put the greens in your favorite salad serving dish, and set aside.

Next, get those toppings ready.  Trim and chop a green onion or two, slice an avocado, and grab one handful of cashews, another handful dried lo mein noodles.  Evenly sprinkle these over your greens.

Before you dig in, don’t forget the dressing!  Almost any dressing works with this versatile salad, but I like to use a recipe for Oriental Dressing, given to me by Sarah Oudman.  Mix together rice vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, vegetable oil, and a touch of sesame oil in a jar (or, in my case, a recycled Grolsch beer bottle) and shake well. This dressing is delicious but strong—advice from Farmer Dan: Dress lightly to enjoy the full flavors of the greens!

This salad works great as a side, but you can easily make into your main dish by adding more protein like sliced fried eggs, bleu cheese, grilled chicken, or chickpeas.

Salad with Grolsch (resized)

 What’s your favorite salad recipe?  What kind of salads would you like to see featured on the blog?

Photographs and Food Styling: Anne Kingma

First of Spring Salad
Serves 4
A fresh, raw salad to kick off the start of spring.
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Prep Time
15 min
Total Time
15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Total Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 4 cups greens (baby spinach, baby salad mix, baby beet greens, etc)
  2. 1-2 chopped green onions, trimmed and chopped
  3. 1 avocado, sliced into 1” pieces
  4. ÂĽ cup cashews
  5. ÂĽ cup dried lo mein noodles
  6. ÂĽ cup rice vinegar
  7. 1 Tbsp sugar
  8. 3 Tbsp soy sauce
  9. 2 Tbsp vegetable oil
  10. 1 tsp sesame oil
Instructions
  1. Mix greens and place in salad serving dish.
  2. Evenly sprinkle green onions, avocado pieces, cashews, and noodles over the greens.
  3. Pour rice vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, vegetable oil, and sesame oil in a jar. Shake well.
  4. Right before eating, lightly dress the salad.
Notes
  1. To make this dish your main meal, add more protein, such as sliced fried eggs, bleu cheese, grilled chicken, or chickpeas.
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/

Recipe: Roasted Chicken with Herbs and Carrots

There’s almost no better way to eat a homegrown, cool-season carrot than raw. 

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crated carrotsRenowned winter grower Eliot Coleman writes, “The tastiness resulting from fall growing and cool-soil storage elevates the humble carrot to another plane.”  Dan and I agree.  During a busy harvest morning, we’ll pull a carrot from the ground, brush it off, and enjoy a crunchy, sweet snack in the middle of the garden.

Dan enjoying a freshly harvested carrot

harvest with a smile

In my opinion, however, there is another “best” way to eat a garden-fresh carrot, and that’s roasted.  You can roast carrots on their own, tossed with a bit of olive oil, sea salt and herbs, or you can roast carrots the way I like to do it—beneath a chicken.

Start by completely thawing your chicken in the refrigerator.  (For me, this means taking the chicken out of the freezer two days ahead of time.)  When you’re ready to cook, remove the chicken from the fridge and let set for 30 minutes on the counter.  Preheat the oven to 400 degrees, then get started on the prep work.

First, you need to make the herb butter that makes this chicken so delicious.  Cut 6 tbsp of butter into a bowl (or food processor if you want to speed up the process).  Beat the butter with a spoon or fork until it’s soft and smooth.  Chop up fresh parsley, fresh thyme, a green onion (all from your share!), along with 3 cloves of garlic.  Toss all this deliciousness into the butter, and add the lemon juice and a touch of salt and pepper.  Stir it all together and set aside.

herb butter

Next, prep your vegetables.  Peel and quarter the onion.  Trim the carrots (you’re always welcome to trim a little extra for a snack!).  Spread the carrots and two of the onion quarters evenly in your roasting pan, and spoon the sherry over the vegetables.

Now back to the chicken.  Start by patting the skin dry with paper towels.  (In order for the chicken to roast crisply, the skin needs to be dry.)  Place the two remaining onion quarters inside the chicken cavity, then tie the legs together with kitchen twine.

Spread half the herb butter over the breast side of the chicken like so:

breast side up

Then turn the chicken upside-down (breast-side down) on the roasting rack, and carefully dab on the rest of the herb butter:

breast side down in pan

Roast the chicken in this position for about 20 minutes, until browned, then remove both the chicken and the vegetables from the oven.

Turn the chicken breast-side up, where it’ll stay for the rest of the roasting process.  Baste the chicken with the juices from the roasting pan.  Flip the carrots and onions so that they’re thoroughly coated with the basting juices, then return everything to the oven.

Roast for 55-70 minutes longer, depending on the size of your chicken.  During this time, baste the chicken and vegetables once or twice more.  If the chicken’s getting too crispy for your liking, tent the bird with tin foil to protect it from burning. The chicken is done when the internal temperature at the thickest part of the thigh reads 165 degrees. 

After removing the chicken from the oven, wrap it in tin foil and let it rest for 15 minutes.  Meanwhile, keep those carrots and onions hot!  I often leave the veggies in the oven to continue to roast because I like them best when they’re at the transition point between well-browned to beginning-blackened.  If that’s not your preference, remove the veggies and wrap in tin foil.

roasted carrots

Admittedly, this recipe is somewhat time-intensive, but I think the end result—fall-off-the-bone chicken, literally-melt-in-your-mouth carrots—is worth every single minute.

plated herbed chicken

For the printable of this recipe, scroll down.

A Couple Notes:

1) For this recipe, I used a chicken that we raised on pasture here at our farm.  We’re not currently raising or selling broilers, although we might in the future!  We encourage you to purchase chickens that are raised humanely, such as Miller Poultry sold at Tysens in DeMotte.  

2) You know I’m not finished with a post until I’ve mentioned something about green smoothies!  Carrot tops are full of nutrients, and while I don’t recommend using only carrot tops as your green, I do suggest throwing a few fronds in with your spinach or kale.  Let me know what you think!

Photographs and Food Styling: Anne Kingma

Roasted Chicken with Herbs and Carrots
Serves 4
A whole chicken and homegrown carrots roasted with herbs and butter.
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
1 hr 15 min
Total Time
1 hr 45 min
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
1 hr 15 min
Total Time
1 hr 45 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 whole chicken, 3-4 lbs
  2. 1 onion, peeled and quartered
  3. 12 medium-sized carrots
  4. 1/4 cup cooking sherry
  5. 6 tbsp butter
  6. 3 tbsp chopped parsley
  7. 1 tbsp chopped green onions
  8. 1 tsp chopped thyme
  9. 1 tsp lemon juice
  10. 3 cloves garlic, minced
  11. Salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Remove chicken from fridge and let set for 30 minutes at room temperature.
  2. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  3. Cut butter into a bowl and beat with a spoon or fork to soften. Add parsley, green onions, thyme, garlic, lemon juice, and salt and pepper. Thoroughly combine butter and herbs. Set aside.
  4. Trim carrots but do not peel. Spread carrots and two onion quarters in roasting pan. Spoon the sherry over the carrots and onions.
  5. Pat the chicken skin dry with paper towels. Place remaining onion quarters into the chicken cavity. Tie the legs together with kitchen twine.
  6. Spread the herb butter all over the chicken. Place the chicken upside down (breast side down) on a roasting rack.
  7. Place the roasting rack over the roasting pan and place in preheated oven.
  8. Roast for about 20 minutes, or until browned. Remove chicken and vegetables from oven. Turn chicken over so that it’s breast side up, and baste chicken with juices from roasting pan. Flip carrots and onions, making sure the vegetables are well-coated in basting juices.
  9. Return the chicken and vegetables to the oven. Roast for 55-70 minutes, basting once or twice during that time, until the internal temperature measures 165 degrees at the thickest part of the thigh. Tent if necessary to prevent burning.
  10. Remove chicken from oven. Wrap in large sheet of foil and let set for 15 minutes.
  11. If necessary, continue to roast carrots and onions while the chicken rests, until vegetables are completely roasted and browned.
  12. Place the chicken on a serving platter. Arrange vegetables around the chicken. Garnish platter with fresh parsley. Take a picture. Carve and enjoy!
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/

6 Ways to Eat Leafy Greens

Each week you, as a farm member, take home 5-8 different types of leafy greens:

  • Baby salad greens
  • Baby spinach
  • Mesclun mix
  • Beet greens
  • Radish greens
  • Carrot tops
  • Kale
  • Swiss chard

Fall Share You’re receiving enough leafy greens by now that you could probably eat them for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and I want to help you do just that.  Here are six ways you can eat your greens this week.

1. In a Sandwich

The boys and I had lunch at the park last week, and I brought the fixing for bologna sandwiches.  I made mine by lightly spreading mayonnaise over Wasa rye crisps, then adding two pieces of bologna and a generous layer of mustard greens.  If I’d thought to bring them along, I would have added green onions.  So delicious I had to make another.

2. As a Base

Tender baby salad greens, mesclun mix, and/or baby spinach work wonderfully as a base for fried rice.  I make Indonesian fried rice (Nasi Goreng) and place it directly from the hot wok onto a plate of greens, where the heat from the rice gently wilts the greens.  You can also use salad greens as a base for re-heated leftovers or stir-fry.

3. Sautéed or Steamed

This is the perfect option for cooking greens like Swiss chard, kale, and large spinach.  One of Dan’s favorite side dishes is lightly steamed Swiss chard sprinkled with freshly ground pepper and sea salt.

4. As a Salad

This option almost goes without saying.  Try a savory salad with fresh herbs, green onions, peanuts, and a touch of sesame oil one day, and a sweet salad with apples, toasted walnuts, and gorgonzola the next.  By varying your toppings (cheese, nuts, beans, fruits, veggies, meat, dressing), the possibilities are endless.

5. In a Soup

You can add chopped cooking greens to many soups.  One of our favorites is Spicy Potato Sausage and Greens Soup (From Asparagus to Zucchini cookbook), a delicious soup made with chicken broth and topped with a spoonful of cream.  You can also make soups where greens star as the main ingredient.  This past summer I tried a new recipe, Kale Potato Soup, from the cookbook Simply in Season (one of our beloved cookbooks!).  The kale—cooked and pureed—turned the soup completely green.  Before I showed it to my boys, I told them we were having a very special dish for dinner: HULK SOUP.  Dinner that night was full of loud outbursts as we all morphed into Hulk over and over again, but Harper and Asher cleaned out their bowls with no problem.

6. In a Smoothie

Every day Dan and I drink a quart of green smoothie, a beverage made up of 1/2 to 2/3 greens, and 1/2 to 1/3 fruit.  I started drinking green smoothies about a year ago, after Dan’s parents introduced me to Victoria Boutenko’s Greens for Life and Green Smoothie Revolution.  Since then I’ve experienced an increase in energy and a significant decrease in allergic reactions—I think of green smoothies as my daily dose of a super-vitamin.

If you’ve never made a green smoothie before, here are two important considerations:

  • Use a high-speed blender like a Vitamix or Nutribullet. You can use a standard blender, but the greens may not blend well, resulting in an unpalatable drink.  Also, Boutenko describes how greens, which are high in cellulose, are more easily assimilated into the body when broken-down in a high-speed blender.
  • Rotate your greens for maximum nutritive benefits. Boutenko recommends rotating a variety of at least 7 greens.

For more information, read Boutenko’s “Guidelines for Green Smoothie Consumption for Optimal Health Benefits.” 

As I said at the beginning of this post, you’re getting enough greens to eat them for three meals a day—including breakfast.  This week I made a frittata with radish greens and beet greens, green onions, herbs, and potatoes.  Pair the frittata with a green smoothie, and you’re off to a great start to your day.

Potato Garlic Herbs

Begin by prepping the vegetables: chop the green onions, leafy greens of your choice, and herbs, and slice the potatoes.  I used fingerling potatoes in this recipe, sliced thinly so I didn’t have to cook them ahead of time.  If you don’t have fingerlings, use baby red or baby Yukon gold potatoes.

Once your veggies are ready, heat your skillet over medium heat and add about a tablespoon of olive oil.  I used my cast iron skillet—if you don’t have cast iron make sure your frying pan is flameproof as this dish requires broiling for its finishing touch.

Green Onions

Add the chopped green onions and sautĂ© for about three minutes, until they’re just browning around the edges.  Push the onions to the side of the skillet, then add the potatoes and spread them evenly over the base of the pan.  Let the potatoes sit for about 4 minutes.

Meanwhile, lightly beat 6 eggs.  Add ÂĽ cup milk (I used whole milk) and add a touch of salt and pepper.  Set aside.

Potatoes in Skillet

Flip the potatoes and let the other side sit for about four minutes.  The first side should be golden brown.  Once the potatoes are done, add the greens, garlic, and herbs and cook for another two minutes, stirring often to prevent sticking.

Preheat the broiler to high.  Spread the greens/potato/herb mixture evenly over the base of the skillet, then pour the eggs over the potato mixture.  Press the veggies under the eggs, then evenly sprinkle the cheese on top.

Frittata in Skillet

Cook over medium heat for 5-6 minutes, until the eggs are just beginning to set.  Then place the skillet under the broiler for 1-2 minutes (do not overbroil!) until the frittata is set and golden.

DSC06251 - Copy

You can serve the frittata hot, warm, or cold and cut into wedges.  If you’d like, serve with pancakes (I made gluten-free oatmeal pancakes) and a green smoothie made of spinach, beet greens, banana, and tropical frozen fruit mix.

Scroll down for the printables of the Potato, Green Onions, and Greens Frittata and the Every Day Green Smoothie.

How do you eat your greens?  I’d love to hear your ideas–leave me a comment and let me know!

Photographs and Food Styling: Anne Kingma

Frittata with Potatoes, Green Onions, and Greens
Serves 4
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
35 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
35 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 Tbsp olive oil
  2. 5 green onions, chopped
  3. 12 oz fingerling or baby potatoes, thinly sliced
  4. 2 cups chopped cooking greens (radish tops, kale, swiss chard, spinach, and/or beet greens)
  5. 2 cloves garlic, minced
  6. 4 sprigs fresh parsley, chopped
  7. 4 sprigs fresh oregano, chopped
  8. 15 sprigs thyme, leaves only
  9. 6 eggs, lightly beaten
  10. ÂĽ cup milk
  11. 1 cup feta cheese, or other cheese
  12. Salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Heat olive oil in large cast iron skillet or flameproof frying pan.
  2. When oil is hot, add green onions and sauté for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. Add the potatoes and cook for 4 minutes on each side, until potatoes are browned.
  4. Add greens, garlic, and herbs and sauté for 2 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Spread the potato/greens/onion mixture evenly over the base of the skillet.
  6. Preheat broiler to high.
  7. Add milk to the beaten eggs and season with salt and pepper. Pour egg mixture over the potato/greens/onion mixture.
  8. Sprinkle the feta cheese on top and press lightly into the eggs. Cook over medium heat for 5-6 minutes, until the eggs are just beginning to set.
  9. Place skill under the broiler and cook the top for 1-2 minutes, until set and golden. Do not overbroil!
  10. Serve hot, warm, or cold, cut into wedges.
Notes
  1. I prefer feta cheese in this dish, but I made half with mozzarella to accommodate my children. Harper (age 6) liked the frittata with both types of cheese, but Asher (age 4) would only eat the mozzarella version.
Adapted from Potato, Red Onion, and Feta Frittata by Nicola Graimes
Adapted from Potato, Red Onion, and Feta Frittata by Nicola Graimes
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/
Every Day Green Smoothie
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup spinach
  2. 1 cup beet greens
  3. 1 cup frozen fruit mix
  4. 1/2 banana
  5. 1 1/2 cups water
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients in high speed blender and blend thoroughly.
Notes
  1. I used spinach and beet greens in this smoothie, but you can use any variety of greens: Swiss chard, lettuce, radish tops (for a spicier smoothie), carrot tops, mesclun, and so on.
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/
 

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