Tag: mustard greens

Recipe: Roasted Carrots and Greens

With our last week of this season’s CSA at hand and the holiday season just around the corner, I want to leave you with a simple recipe you could serve at your Thanksgiving dinner.  Or you could just make this tonight because it’s cozy and nourishing and pretty much perfect for a brisk fall night.

Start by placing a rectangular rimmed baking stone in the oven and preheating to 400 F.  If you don’t have a stone, use any rimmed baking sheet.

Next, scrub and trim 2 pounds of carrots (around 18 medium-sized carrots).  Quarter the carrots lengthwise and put them in a large bowl.  I use the Pampered Chef 8-cup batter bowl because it has a lid, which makes the next step easier.  And that next step is tossing those lovely carrot pieces with 1 tablespoon of olive oil.  (As tempting as it may be, don’t add extra oil olive or the carrots won’t roast well!)

Place the carrots evenly onto the baking stone and lightly season with sea salt and freshly ground pepper.  Roast for 20 minutes, then flip them, making sure to keep them evenly spaced (none on top of each other).  Roast for 10 more minutes.

While the carrots are roasting, prep the rest of your ingredients.  Chop 1/4 cup walnuts, mince 2 cloves of garlic, and roughly chop 3 cups of arugula/tat soi/mustard greens.  When the carrots are done with their initial roasting,  sprinkle with the garlic and walnuts and roast for 5-7 minutes more, until the nuts are toasted and the garlic tender.

Remove the stone from the oven, fold in the greens, and sprinkle the whole batch of goodness with 1/4 cider vinegar.  Serve immediately.  Enjoy! 

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Roasted Carrots with Greens
A perfect roasted vegetable side for Thanksgiving dinner.
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
45 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
45 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 pounds carrots, scrubbed and trimmed
  2. 1 T olive oil
  3. sea salt, to taste
  4. freshly ground pepper, to taste
  5. 2 garlic cloves, minced
  6. 1/4 cup walnuts, chopped
  7. 3 cups arugula, tat soi, and/or mustard greens, stems removed and roughly chopped
Instructions
  1. Place rimmed baking stone in oven and preheat to 400 F.
  2. Quarter carrots lengthwise. Place carrots in large bowl and toss with olive oil.
  3. Place carrots on baking sheet, making sure they're evenly spaced. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Roast carrots 20 minutes. Flip them over, then roast for 10 minutes more.
  5. Remove carrots from oven. Sprinkle evenly with garlic and walnuts. Roast 5-7 minutes, until nuts are toasted and garlic is tender.
  6. Remove from oven. Fold in greens, then sprinkle cider vinegar over the carrots.
  7. Serve immediately. Enjoy!
Adapted from Better Homes and Gardens "Roasted Sweets and Greens"
Adapted from Better Homes and Gardens "Roasted Sweets and Greens"
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/

Recipe: Orzo with Spinach and Garlic

 Trisha and Ryan Belstra have been farm members since our very first season back in 2010, back when we offered a summer CSA, which happened to be the summer Trisha and I were both pregnant with our second child.  Six years later, the Belstra’s are still farm members and our babies are no longer babies but still dear friends. Yay for farming and friendship!

This week Trisha’s sharing an easy weeknight recipe featuring comforting pasta and cooked spinach, although you could easily switch out the spinach for tat soi, radish tops, mustard greens, kale, or arugula for a spicier flavor in this delicious orzo recipe!

Here are the instructions from Trisha’s kitchen:

Hello, fellow farm members!  I’m Trisha Belstra and this is my family: Ryan, Nolan, Norah and Leah.

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We live in DeMotte and couldn’t feel more blessed to have the Perkins family as our friends.  What a delight it’s been to be apart of their farm also.  Fall is my absolute favorite season and being able to come pick up these fresh, beautiful vegetables each week during fall share time just makes it all the better!

I’m excited to share with you a quick comforting dinner or side dish–you get to choose.  There are a few different options with this recipe, which makes it nice depending on what you’re in the mood for.  Let’s get started.

Start by making your orzo according to the package directions.  You can use brown rice noodles for a gluten free version of this dish.  While your orzo is cooking, roughly chop 8 cups of spinach, then set aside.

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Next, roughly chop one to two leeks (white and light green part only) and mince two to three cloves of garlic. If you have a garlic press, you can use that instead of mincing to help speed up this quick dish all the more.

In a wok, add 2 tablespoons of olive oil and sauté your garlic and leeks on medium heat for a minute or two.  Add your chopped spinach and sauté for a few more minutes.

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Then add your drained orzo to the mix, pour in another tablespoon or so of olive oil, and season to taste with sea salt.  Stir until warmed. 

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Serve and top with Parmesan cheese to taste.  If you like things spicy like I do, try adding some crushed red pepper flakes too.

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Earlier I mentioned there a couple other options for this dish. Sometimes I add blackened Cajun chicken–just chicken breasts rubbed with Cajun seasoning, then slightly charred on the stovetop.  Or, if you’d like a saucier version, you can prepare an Alfredo sauce on the side.  I usually leave the sauce separate because we prefer the plainer version for lunch leftovers.

Here’s how to make the sauce.  In a medium saucepan melt 6 tablespoons of butter.  Once that is melted whisk in 6 tablespoons of flour, 2 teaspoons of salt, 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg and 1/4 teaspoon of pepper.  Gradually pour in 4 cups of milk (whole is best but 2% works just fine too).  Bring to a boil and cook, stirring continually for two minutes.  Remove from heat and stir in 2/3 cup of grated Parmesan cheese.  Pour over your orzo dish if desired.  And again, if you like to heat it up, add some Cajun seasoning to this sauce.  Yu-um.  Our seasoning bottle has been ending up on the dinner table lately.  

I hope you enjoy this warm dish as much as our family does as this cold weather begins! 

Happy Fall, ya’ll! 🙂

 

Spinach with Orzo and Garlic
Serves 6
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Ingredients
  1. 16 oz orzo, brown rice pasta, egg noodles, or rice
  2. 3 T olive oil
  3. 1-2 leeks, white and light green part only, roughly chopped
  4. 2-3 cloves large garlic, minced or pressed
  5. 8 cups spinach, roughly chopped
  6. Salt to taste
  7. Cajun or red pepper flakes, optional
  8. Parmesan cheese to taste
Instructions
  1. Cook orzo according to package directions; drain.
  2. Heat a wok over medium heat. Add 1 T olive oil.
  3. Once the oil is hot, saute the garlic and leek for about 2 minutes.
  4. Add the spinach and saute 2 more minutes.
  5. Add the orzo. Stir in 1 tablespoon of olive oil and season to taste with sea salt. Stir until warm.
  6. Serve immediately, topping each individual plate with Parmesan cheese and red pepper flakes.
To vary this recipe, try one of these options
  1. Add blackened Cajun chicken.
  2. Add Alfredo sauce.
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/

Recipe: Chopped Salad with Asian Greens

This spring we’re growing some new-to-us greens from the Asian Greens section of the seed catalog—Tat Soi, White-Stemmed Pac Choy, and Vitamin Green—along with a new-to-us mustard green, Garnet Giant Mustard.  Full-size, these greens are most often used in cooking, but now in early spring, in their tender baby size, the Asian Greens are perfect raw and fresh.

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I’ll admit these Asian and mustard greens take some getting used to.  I’ll also admit I haven’t had a great deal of success in getting my boys—ages 4 and 6—to fully embrace these flavorful greens, at least at the dinner table.  But the other day, I was working in the hoop house while discussing Bakugans with my 4-year-old Asher, and I nonchalantly offered him a few Vitamin Green leaves, which he popped in his mouth and ate without comment.  Okay, okay, he was distracted—I mean, we were talking about Bakugans!—but still he ate some and that’s a start.

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Our hope is that you too will give these a try.  So at this point in the season, instead of selling varieties individually, we’ve decided to toss them together into in Asian Greens Salad Mix and offer you what is essentially a nutrient powerhouse.  When eating all four of these greens together, you’ll get a great source of calcium, beta carotenes, vitamins A, C, and K, antioxidants, and phytonutrients.  Deborah Madison, cook and author of Vegetable Literacy, says of mustard greens’ health benefits—and this holds true for the Asian greens too—“These plants are such dynamos that we would do well to find ways to enjoy them.”

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One way I’ve enjoyed these greens this past week is in a chopped salad with a gingery, garlicky dressing.

For this recipe, you’re going to start the night before by making the dressing, which doubles as a chicken marinade.  Mix together rice vinegar, soy sauce, minced fresh ginger, minced garlic, peanut oil, and olive oil, and shake vigorously in your jar (or, if you’ve had a Grolsch since my first post this spring, use the bottle!).

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Thinly slice ½ pound of boneless, skinless chicken thighs (or breasts if you prefer white meat) into 1-inch pieces.  For local folks looking for semi-locally raised chicken, try Miller Amish Poultry from Tysens Grocery in DeMotte. Place the chicken in a bowl, pour about half the dressing over it, and marinate overnight, or at least 8 hours.

Fast forward to salad time.  First step, heat up that trusty skillet because it’s time to sauté the marinated chicken, cooking about 4 minutes on each side.  When it’s finished cooking, set the chicken aside to cool.

Meanwhile, gather up the rest of your ingredients in a large bowl, starting with about 8 cups of the Asian Green Salad Mix, then adding a half cup of each of these:

  • fresh pineapple chunks
  • fresh Clementine wedges
  • sliced radishes
  • sliced green onions
  • peanuts
  • chicken strips

Toss all this goodness together, then dump everything out on your cutting board and—hence the salad’s name—get chopping!  I like this chopping advice from First We Feast:

Arrange your greens in a rough rectangle, then use your largest, sharpest knife to cut all the way down to the board. Lift the knife, and cut again in a parallel line about an inch from the first. Repeat until you reach the end of the rectangle. Rotate the board 90 degrees, then do again. That might be enough chopping, but if you want a finer mince, toss the ingredients to redistribute, then chop in a grid once more. 

Once you have the consistency you’re looking for, return everything to your large bowl and add a couple tablespoons of that dressing you made the night before.  Gently toss the salad, then place the whole mix in a serving dish.  At this point, you can leave the salad as is, or decorate by lining up about ½ cup of each ingredient on top of the salad.

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One last note about this salad.  I’m a big fan of using local, seasonal ingredients whenever possible.  Obviously, pineapple and clementines don’t really fit the bill here, but considering the only “fruit” I have growing in my garden right now is rhubarb, I decided to branch out.  If that’s not your style, you’re welcome to try the rhubarb—just make sure to tell me how it tasted!

Photography and Food Styling: Anne Kingma

Chopped Salad with Asian Greens
A refreshing chopped salad with Asian Greens, marinated chicken, spring veggies, and fresh fruit.
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For the dressing
  1. 1/4 cup rice vinegar
  2. 2 T soy sauce
  3. 2 tsp brown sugar
  4. 1 T grated ginger
  5. 2 large cloves garlic, minced
  6. ¼ cup peanut oil
  7. ¼ cup olive oil
For the salad
  1. 8 cups Asian Greens Salad Mix
  2. 1 cup pineapple chunks
  3. 1 cup Clementine segments
  4. 1 cup peanuts
  5. 1 cup radishes, sliced
  6. 1 cup green onions, sliced
  7. 1 cup sliced, marinated and sautéed chicken thighs
For the dressing
  1. Mix together dressing ingredients in a jar: rice vinegar, soy sauce, brown sugar, minced ginger, minced garlic, peanut oil, and olive oil. Set aside.
For the salad
  1. Thinly slice ½ pound chicken thighs. Place in a shallow dish and pour about half of the dressing over the chicken. Cover and refrigerate over night or at least 8 hours.
  2. When the chicken is ready, sauté the strips for about 4 minutes on each side until the chicken is done. Set aside to cool.
  3. In a large bowl, combine salad mix, and ½ cup of each: pineapple, Clementine segments, peanuts, radishes, green onions, and chicken. Toss together, then pour out on a large cutting board. Chop the ingredients into small pieces.
  4. Return the chopped salad to the large bowl.
  5. Drizzle about 2 Tbsp of the remaining dressing onto the salad. Gently toss.
  6. Place the salad into a serving dish. Line or sprinkle the remaining pineapple, Clementine, peanuts, radishes, green onions, and chicken on top of the salad, and serve.
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/

Recipe: Wilted Mesclun with Sausage and Rice

 

I used to be suspicious of mesclun mix.  Dan would bring me all these strange-looking spiky greens and I would stare at them, thinking, Did you just bring me a basketful of weeds to eat?

But about two years ago, I decided it was time to give these greens a chance.  I crunched on a handful of mesclun, and I discovered that the spiciness of the mustard greens complemented the sweetness of the baby lettuce—in other words, once I tried it, I found that I liked it.

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Mesclun is not the actual name of a salad green, but rather refers to a mix of greens.  We buy most of our seeds from High Mowing Seeds, an organic seed company located in Vermont.  Their mesclun mix contains a delicious combination of lettuce and mustards greens–and you don’t want to be missing out on mustard greens.  Mustard greens are high in vitamins A, C, E, and K, which means they strengthen your blood and bones (vitamin K) while also working as an antioxidant (vitamins A, C, and E).

Eaten raw, mesclun mix can liven up any salad.  The other day my in-laws tried mesclun with Italian dressing, gorgonzola cheese, sunflower seeds, and Trader Joe’s orange cranberries.  I enjoy the greens simply tossed with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, as the base for a hearty taco salad, or topped with hardboiled egg and green onions.

This past week I also tried mesclun cooked, wilting the greens and pairing them with sausage and rice.  Dan and I savored every bite of this delicious dish. 

To make Wilted Mesclun with Sausage and Rice, start by cooking the rice (I used brown basmati) and setting the oven to 200 degrees.

Chopping Mesclun

While the rice is cooking, chop up one small onion, two cloves of garlic, and about ½ lb. of mesclun mix.

When the rice has about 25 minutes cooking time left, heat up your skillet—I used my trusty cast iron skillet—over medium heat.  If not using cast iron, you may need to add a little oil to your frying pan.  Once the skillet is sizzling hot, add ½ pound of pork sausage links (6-8 links).  I bought the sausage used in this recipe from DeMotte’s local meat market, Yesteryears.  (A little aside: If you haven’t been to Yesteryears, I encourage you to check it out!  They carry a good meat selection, homemade cookies and apple slices, and Dutch imports like Leyden cheese, Nasi Goreng spice mix, and stroopwafels.  Okay, back to the recipe.)

Browned Sausages

Once the sausages are good and brown, wrap in foil and place them in the pre-heated oven to stay hot.

Cooking Onions (large)

Turn the heat to medium-high and cook the onion until browned and fragrant.

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Toss in the garlic and about half the greens. Let the greens sit for about 15 seconds, then stir them around for another 30 seconds or so until they’re wilted.  Throw in the rest of the greens, let them sit, give them a stir, and season with salt and pepper.

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Dress each plate with a large spoonful (or more!) of greens, 3-4 sausages, rice, and–if you like–a piece of crusty bread.  Enjoy!

For the printable of this recipe, scroll down to the bottom of the page.  For thoughts on serving this dish to children, continue reading.

Dan and I loved this dish, but our children did not share this sentiment.  Harper (age 6) tried the greens and while he tolerated them, he said they were not his favorite.  Asher (age 4) managed one bite and then covered his rice with shredded cheddar cheese.  Granted, this is only the experience of two children in one household, but let me just say I was glad we had another veggie side dish (acorn squash) to go with their rice.

 Photographs and Food Styling: Anne Kingma

Wilted Mesclun with Sausage and Rice
Serves 2
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
45 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
45 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup brown basmati rice (or rice of your choice)
  2. ½ pound pork sausage links (6-8 links)
  3. 1 small onion, chopped (about 1 cup)
  4. 2 large cloves garlic, minced
  5. ½ lb. mesclun mix, coarsely chopped (8 cups)
  6. Salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Cook rice according to package instructions.
  2. While rice is cooking, chop the onion, mince the garlic, and chop the mesclun. Set aside.
  3. When the rice has 20 minutes to go, heat a large cast iron skillet over medium heat. (If not using cast iron, you may need to add some oil to the skillet). Add the sausage links to the skillet and cook, turning every 1-2 minutes for about 12 minutes, until brown on all sides. Make sure no pink remains in the meat.
  4. Wrap cooked sausages in foil and keep hot.
  5. Keep skillet at medium heat, and cook onion in the sausage drippings for about 5 minutes, or until the onions turn brown and fragrant.
  6. Add garlic and about half the mesclun. Turn heat to medium-high and cook mesclun for about 1 minute, until wilted. Add the rest of the mesclun and cook for another minute, until wilted.
  7. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve mesclun mixture over rice, with hot sausage links on the side.
Notes
  1. To vary this recipe, trying using a spicier sausage. Also, if you don't have brown basmati rice, use whatever rice you have on hand. Sometimes I make half brown and half white rice, and if I'm low on time, I'll make all white jasmine rice since it only takes 15-20 minutes.
Perkins' Good Earth Farm http://perkinsgoodearthfarm.com/
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